Welcome to my world, one where drawing is not subservient to any other art form, where the line is master of the whole story.  A line that glistens and glides across the page, that dances between the dots and writ large the magic spots; a line that journeys between the dark of night and the dazzling displays of daytime colour.  A line that joins a smudge to spread a pattern, a line that does not corral or fence but one that allows freedom to run riot, unleashing the imagination, gives substance and order to chaos and chaos to order – there are no boundaries to the imagination in a time and place where things are not always what they seem to be.


David Green was born in 1940 in Kent, during ‘The Blitz’ an event that has left a lasting impression on both the man and his art. Post graduating from the Royal College of Art in 1964 Green taught at Croydon College of Art, Goldsmiths’ College of Art and guest lectured and conducted workshops and seminars in the southern counties whilst maintaining a freelance design and arts practice profile. In 1976 Green was sponsored by the Australia Council to conduct a lecture tour and series of workshops around Australia and New Zealand. Green emigrated from the United Kingdom in 1978 having accepted a position as Senior Lecturer at RMIT in Textiles. Green left RMIT in 1985 to take up the position of Head of the School of Visual and Performing Arts at the now Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga and in 1989 was appointed the inaugural Professor of Visual Arts. In 2001 he was appointed Head of the Wagga Wagga Campus.

During this time Green continued to supervise a number of masters and doctoral candidates. He retired from the University in 2010. Green has successfully juggled his academic and artistic career for the past 50 years. During this time he has had a number of solo exhibitions and participated in excess of fifty group exhibitions. Green is represented in a number of public collections including the Power House Museum, Queen Victoria Museum Art Gallery Tasmania, State Craft Collection of Victoria, Ararat City Art Gallery, Albury City Art Gallery, Wagga City Art Gallery Warnambool City Art Gallery, Tamworth Fibre Collection.

He is the author of four books and a former Chair of the Crafts Board of the Australia Council, Green is still actively engaged in workshops and seminars in addition to pursuing his practice as an full-time exhibiting artist with two solo exhibitions in 2010. David now resides on the Sunshine Coast with his partner and three teenage children.

28 thoughts on “about

  1. Thanks for visiting my blog, mostly because it has brought me to see your wonderful intricate drawings! I feel most at home drawing but am often intimidated by other mediums, so it is inspiring to hear and see your dedication to line.

  2. Thanks David for visiting my blog and bringing me to see your wonderful work. I love drawing and I love collage, assemblage, mixed media and back to drawing again. Please let me know of future exhibitions that you are in.

  3. hello David, thanks for stopping by my blog – I’m so glad to have found your works this way. Drawing is the best and yours really speak to me! I think you’ve inspired me to work on mine again. (And I love the name Wagga Wagga!)

  4. Thank you for visiting my blog for my Masters Thesis. Your works are beautiful, and your abstractions intricate and creative. It is great to get to know and find artists new to me. I hope you enjoyed my works and works in progress for my Thesis.

  5. David, we have to thank you for the ‘likes’ today. Very much appreciated. Btw I’ve just cooked an amazing John Dory (I must have mentioned the fish before). There must be one somewhere in your work — the colours and lines of the fish are/would be perfect.

  6. Hello David, Yes line is master. Hand drawn lines-drawn with care-imply purpose when none was there-Once completed, questions deleted-comes a design all can share.
    I enjoyed your bio, and your work to. I was born in 43 though i’ve not seen the blitz, I have shared the same time on earth and seen other things. I find that the line is the map maker by which all ideas are located, leaving a trail to the aware to find where artists are pointing.
    Thanks for visiting my site as well.

  7. I chanced across Black White and a Collecting Box. It’s a stunning piece. Thanks in turn for liking one of mine which brought me back for a proper look. Your art is fabulous. Three aspects struck me, the intricacy of your drawings, the single (usually) splash of colour and the eccentric concepts. I’ve enjoyed perusing.

    • Thanks for your comments – I had never thought of myself as being eccentric just questioning the world we inhabit but as eccentricity is being off centre you are most probably right – perhaps like our forebears I will end up building visual follies.

      • “eccentric”
        No offence was intended, quite the opposite in fact. I was just grasping for the right word. Off centre, perhaps Thought provoking might be closer. Anyway, enjoyable: I am now following you for more.

  8. Hi David, as a result of being given awards, and not following them up, I have just done a post offering ‘bouquets’ rather than awards, and you are one of the people I have listed as being particularly inspiring, your drawings fill me with excitement, and always make me want to go and start a new drawing NOW! Imagination is the absolute essence of good art I feel. I do hope you don’t mind! Happy New Year!

    • Thank you Anna – sorry for the long delay but have been in the studio non stop – consequently I have not kept the site up to date or looked at it for sometime- very remiss of me. Thank you for your kind words I am most flattered

  9. Hello David,

    I used to be one of your students in Printed Textile Design at RMIT in the late 70s. I just wanted to say what a brilliant lecturer you were. You were always incredibly supportive and enthusiastic about my work even though I didn’t quite fit the mold of a textile designer. I think fondly of my time at RMIT.
    I have just discovered your blog and your work truly blows me away. It was a shame (for me!) that I never saw anything you produced when I was your student. You really are an amazing artist and incredibly inspirational. I also love the references through your mark making that speaks of textiles; whether it is a pattern, marks that look like stitches or the appearance of a woven cloth.
    Are you working on a new body of work at the moment? I would love to see more, as I am sure many others who follow you would. AS

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s